Division Arrested Cell Line
Convenient, cost effective cells by the plate.
  • Use frozen cells as ordinary, cost-effective assay reagents for screening
  • Decouple the labor- and time-intensive production of live cells from your screening process (Figure 1)
  • Avoid the variability associated with cell division; get more consistent results
Invitrogen’s Division Arrest technology (1-4) allows you to use frozen cells as ordinary, cost-effective assay reagents for screening. Division Arrested cells exhibit response profiles (Figure 2), similar to growing cells thus ensuring you obtain the correct pharmacological profile. Division Arrested cells may be plated and assayed within 24 hours of thawing. Cell numbers for division arrested cells increase only marginally after plating, thereby removing the variability caused by cell division during the course of an assay and providing more consistent results.
Figure 1 - Decouple the labor and time-intensive production of live cells from your screening process.
Cellular Assay Workflow
Figure 2 - Division arrested cells exhibit response profiles, similar to growing cells thus ensuring you obtain the correct pharmacological profile.
CHO Optimized Conditions
Division Arrested cell lines consist of an expanding list of therapeutic targets, including GPCRs, Nuclear Receptors and hERG. To view a current list of Division Arrested cells and related products by target class, click thru the following links:

  1. Fursov, N. et al. (2005) Improving consistency of cell-based assays by using division- arrested cells. Assay Drug Dev Technol 3(1): 7–15.
  2. Kunapuli, P. et al. (2005) Application of division arrest technology to cell-based HTS: comparison with frozen and fresh cells. Assay Drug Dev Technol 3(1): 17–26.
  3. Digan, M.E. et al. (2005) Evaluation of division-arrested cells for cell-based highthroughput screening and profiling. J Biomol Screen 10(6): 615–623.
  4. Vasudevan, C. et al. (2005) Improving high-content-screening assay performance by using division-arrested cells. Assay & Drug Development Technologies 3(5): 515–523.