Joe Boland discusses 12 Gb runs on the Ion Proton and moving toward 15 Gb


Joe Boland, the Director of Research and Development for the Cancer Genomics Research Lab at the US National Cancer Institute, discusses the performance of his Ion Proton Sequencers. He is currently getting 12 Gb per run and his near-term goal is 15 Gb per machine. Boland's lab has done more than 200 runs on the Ion Proton and has sequenced more than 100 exomes.

 

 

Sinai's Vincent Funari on RNA sequencing his lab is doing with Ion Torrent sequencers


Vincent Funari, director of the Genomics Research Core at Cedars Sinai in Los Angeles, discusses the huge demand that he is seeing from scientists at his facility for sequencing on the Ion PGM Sequencer and the Ion Proton Sequencer. Dr. Funari uses the Ion Proton Sequencer to study gene regulation using RNAseq, ChipSeq, and miRNA sequencing technologies in human conditions like diabetes or neuromuscular disease. He uses the Ion PGM Sequencer for 16S sequencing and for mutation identification in targeted cancer gene panels like lung cancer.

 

 

Dr Max Seibold discusses using the Ion Proton™ Sequencer for an asthma biomarker project


The Seibold Lab is focused on identifying genetic determinants and biomarkers of complex lung diseases, including asthma and pulmonary fibrosis. Dr Seibold's lab recently used the Ion Proton™ Sequencer for an asthma biomarker project.

 

 

Audrey Papp discusses using Ion PGM Sequencer and Ion Proton Sequencer


Audrey Papp discusses using the ion PGM™Sequencer and the seamless migration to the Ion Proton™Sequencer. Papp discusses ease of use, experimental iteration, workflow and the Ion OneTouch™2 System

 

 

Donna Muzny presents Ion Proton data at CSHL, including an 11.5 Gb run


Donna Muzny, Director of Operations at Baylor College of Medicine's Human Genome Sequencing Center, presents Ion Proton™ Sequencer data at the 2012 CSHL Precision Medicine: Personal Genomes & Pharmacogenomics conference on Nov. 14, 2012. The lab had early access to the Ion Proton Sequencer and Muzny presents exome data including an 11.5 Gb run.

 

ASHG speakers
 

Ion Proton™ Sequencer initial data and performance info from Boland, Reid and Allcock

Three researchers — Joe Boland, NCI; Dr. Jeff Reid, Baylor College of Medicine; Dr. Richard Allcock, University of Western Australia — were among the first to use the new Ion Proton™ Sequencer. In the video, they discuss the system's throughput, ease-of-use, speed and affordability.

View full video or view discussions on scalability, simplicity, affordability, and speed.

 

 

Korea-based Service Provider DNA Link Purchases Ten Ion Proton™ Sequencers


Dr. Jong Eun Lee, the CEO of Seoul, Korea–based DNA Link Inc., discusses why his company purchased ten Ion Proton™ Sequencers for delivery in mid-December. Dr. Lee, whose company processes tens of thousands of samples each year, cited three factors in his decision: speed, throughput and cost.

 

 

Rapid innovation and flexibility of the PGM™ and Proton™ Sequencers drives the cancer genome research laboratory into the future


Dr. Boland discusses their exome sequencing pipeline using the Ion PGM™ System and their initial experience using the Ion Proton™ System for this exome sequencing pipeline, including their first run over 10 Gb

 

Dr. Allcock
 

Ion PGM™ and Proton™ Sequencer data


Dr. Richard Allcock, an associate professor at the School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Western Australia, discusses his experience with the Ion PGM and Ion Proton sequencers at ASHG, including data from his initial Ion Proton sequencer runs.

 

Dr. Triche

Total RNA transcript analysis on the Ion Torrent™ platform: insight into functional ncRNA in cancer


Dr. Triche discusses transcriptome sequencing on the Ion Proton™ System at the 24:24 minute mark.

 

Watch additional presentations discussing advancements on and applications of the Ion PGM™ System, as well as their experiences with the data and performance of the Ion Proton™ System on the Ion Torrent channel on Youtube.

 

For Research Use Only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.