Scientific presentations

Presentations

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Why the standardization of Trich regulations and laboratory testing methods across state lines is important for beef producers

Dr. Kathy Simmons - Chief Veterinarian, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Washington DC. Harmonized state trich regulations for the interstate movement of cattle would facilitate cattle movement at the speed of commerce. Well-defined, thoughtful and mutually accepted testing procedures for trich between adjoining states could eliminate redundant testing procedures and reduce the danger to animals and handlers from repeated or unnecessary testing.*

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How the state of Kansas moved from no Trich regulations to implementing current working Trich regulations and accepted diagnostic testing methods

Dr. Bill Brown - Animal Health Commissioner, Kansas Department of Agriculture, Topeka Kansas. Overview of Kansas' enactment of new, more comprehensive trich regulations for the intrastate change of ownership and interstate movement and diagnostic testing of cattle. Dr. Brown appointed a trich working group comprised of four veterinarians and four beef producers to spearhead the evaluation in improving the management of trich in the state of Kansas.*

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Why standardization of both state Trich regulations and laboratory testing procedures benefit veterinarians and their beef producer clients

Dr. Jeremy VanBoening - Republican Valley Medical Center, Alma / Holbrook / Franklin Nebraska. Dr. VanBoening has discovered great variability in recommended sample-handling protocols among state diagnostic labs. Labs varied on whether or not samples needed to be incubated, whether or not to put on ice, how the samples are shipped and the labs’ preferred collection media. Standardizing lab recommendations for sample collection and handling would improve the quality of samples submitted for testing.*

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Development of an Influenza A Sequencing Workflow on Ion PGM™ Sequencer for Improved Surveillance

Complete genome sequencing is crucial for ongoing identification, surveillance and characterization of Influenza A. When sequencing viral genomes, background host nucleic acids may be co-processed during library preparation resulting in a sequencing reaction in which a majority of reads are taken up by the host genome. One solution to this problem is to run a pre-amplification

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Influenza A virus detection from oral fluid and nasal swabs in IAV
inoculated pigs

The detection of IAV in swine populations using nasal swab specimens is labor intensive and relatively insensitive in non-febrile pigs (1). As an alternative, oral fluid samples have been shown to be an excellent surveillance sample for several swine respiratory viruses (2,3,4). The objective of this study was to compare the rate of detection of IAV by RT-PCR, virus isolation (VI), and the VetScan® (Abaxis Inc.).

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Correlation between a commercial real-time PCR assay and HEYM culture for MAP in bovine faecal samples

Disease control programmes for Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) rely on accurate and sensitive tools for the detection of infected animals. Culture based detection of MAP takes many weeks whereas PCR enables rapid detection. Several commercial and many user designed real-time PCR assays exist for the detection of MAP in bovine faecal samples.

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Establishment of Presumptive Diagnostic Cut-Off for Persistently Infected Cattle

Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus causes infection in cattle that has led to major economic losses in both the beef and dairy industries. In utero BVDV infection can induce immunotolerance, causing animals to be persistently infected (PI) for life. PI animals continuously shed the virus and are the main source of BVDV infection in herds.Animals that are acutely or transiently infected will pass the disease and will show

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Pooling of Tritrichomonas foetus Cultured Samples Followed by MagMAX™ Sample Preparation System and Amplification with Applied Biosystems qPCR Reagents

The objectives of this study were 1) to compare multiple sample preparation workflows (boiling, QIAGEN, MagMAX™) and real-time PCR assays currently used by diagnostic testing labs with MagMAX™ and Applied Biosystems VetMAX™reagents for individual T. foetus testing, and (2) to assess the feasibility of.

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Standardized Sample Preparation For Multiple Sample Matrices

There are many different methods to process different sample matrices. This can lead to confusion and frustration for researchers working with multiple sample types. This abstract describes the MagMAX™ Pathogen RNA/DNA kit which is designed to achieve a more standardized solution so labs can order just one kit for a variety of sample matrices as well as different input volumes for each sample. This will allow labs to work.

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